end-gaining, end, end-gainer

The wild cat stalking its quarry inhibits the desire to spring prematurely, and controls to a deliberate end its eagerness for the instant gratification of a natural appetite.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 23

. . . (d) It is essential, in the necessary re-education of the subject through conscious guidance and control, that in every case the "means whereby" rather than the "end" should be held in mind. As long as the "end" is held in mind instead of the "means," the muscular act, or series of acts, will always be performed in accordance with the mode established by old habits.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), pages 117-118

In effect it will be seen that in this, as in all other cases, stress must be laid on the point that it is the means and not the end which must be considered. When the end is held in mind, instinct or long habit will always seek to attain the end by habitual methods. The action is performed below the level of consciousness in its various stages, and only rises to the level of consciousness when the end is being attained by the correct "means whereby."

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), pages 126-127

The orthodox teaching method holds the "end" in view and not the "means whereby." It depends on the giving of orders on the "end-gaining" principle-such an order, for instance, as "Swing up and down again in the same orbit," without consideration of the "means whereby"; that is, without making certain that the pupil has the power to maintain a proper position of his spine and back and to use the limbs correctly during the performance of such physical acts.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 139

It is not the "end" that the teacher and pupil must work for, but the "means whereby."

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 142

As he is subconsciously controlled he will attack the problem through his sense of feeling – through his feeling-tones – and strive directly for the desired "end." He will make no reasoned estimate of the "means whereby" he may make a success.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 147

His efforts are simply subconscious, in a chance endeavour to gain the end in view.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 147

His idea was merely to make an effort to gain the "end" he desired, and he was never really conscious of the actual means he ultimately employed.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 163-164

 In other words, study the "means," not the "end."

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 174

The ''end-gaining'' principle involves a direct procedure on the part of the person endeavouring to gain the desired "end." This direct procedure is associated with dependence upon subconscious guidance and control, leading, in cases where a condition of mal-co-ordination is present, to an unsatisfactory use of the mechanisms and to an increase in the defects and peculiarities already existing.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 29 fn

Unfortunately, he continued to conÞne this use of his reasoning processes to the consideration of the relation of "cause and effect," "means and ends" in connection with his activities in the outside world, both social and physical, and failed to apply this reasoning to the consideration of the relation of "cause and effect," "means and ends" in connection with the use of his psycho-physical organism.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 52-53

The method of psychoanalysis, therefore, like other methods of treatment on a subconscious basis, is an instance of an "end-gaining" attempt to effect the "cure" of a specific trouble by specific means, without consideration being given to the necessity of restoring a satisfactory standard of general psycho-physical functioning and of sensory appreciation.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 78

The child's early efforts in learning any simple subject which forms part of the curriculum are on a specific basis; that is, the child's work is planned for him from the beginning on "end-gaining" lines of teaching him to do specific things in specific ways, and of teaching him to try to get these specific things "right," and long ere the stage of adolescence is reached, this "end-gaining" procedure will have become established, associated with a bad psycho-physical attitude towards the acceptance of new ideas and new experiences, and too often with a serious deterioration in memory.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 90-91

The pupil, thinking only of what his teacher asks him (the "end") and desiring to do it right (as he understands "doing it right" in connection with the act of bending his knees), bends his knees, and bends them as he has always bent them-that is, with a great amount of unnecessary tension and pressure, interfering with his equilibrium, shortening his spine - (by increasing the curve, etc.), stiffening his neck, and so attains his end (the bending of his knees), but at the cost of undue strain and disadvantage in the use of the organism.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 99

The situation is one that no teacher, be he ever so expert, can deal with satisfactorily, one from which the pupil cannot possibly be extricated, until he stops trying to get things right-stops, that is, working blindly for his ends, and gives thought instead to the new means* given to him by his teacher, whereby his ends can be attained.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 101

But in either case everything possible is done to convince him that the "end" does not matter, because given:

  1. the teacher's knowledge of the correct means whereby the particular "end" can be secured;
  2. the pupil's correct apprehension and conscious repetition of the guiding orders or directions relating to these "means-whereby";
  3. the manipulation by the teacher who, with his expert hands, gives to the pupil the reliable sensory appreciation which should result from such directive orders,

. . . it is then merely a matter of time* before the desired end will be secured. In other words, the pupil is asked to take care of the "means," and the "end" will take care of itself.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) pages 112-113

This, again, really means that in the application of my technique the process of inhibition-that is, the act of refusing to respond to the primary desire to gain an "end" - becomes the act of responding (volitionary act) to the conscious reasoned desire to employ the means whereby that "end" may be gained.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 132

Unfortunately it was worked out on a subconscious basis-that is, on the "end-gaining" principle-and the harmful effects of the employment of this "end-gaining" principle grew very rapidly, until at a certain stage in the educational process the child exhibited amongst other shortcomings a lack of attention, or, as they say, "mind-wandering."

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 171

The history of our social plan in the spheres of industrialism, politics, religion, education, medicine, etc., for the past three hundred years is of the greatest interest in this matter of the attitude of those concerned with attempts at reform, organization, advancement and unity, for these attempts will invariably be found to be specific and "end-gaining" attempts, resulting, even where the specific "end" is gained, in new complications leading to social conflict and harmful diversity.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 187

This leads me to the point I wish above all to emphasize, namely, that when a person has reached a give stage of unsatisfactory use and functioning, his habit of "end-gaining" will prove to be the impeding factor in all his attempts to profit by any teaching method whatsoever. Ordinary teaching methods, in whatever sphere, cannot deal with this impeding factor, indeed, they tend actually to encourage ''end-gaining.''

The Use of the Self by F. Matthias Alexander (Methuen, 1932) page 62

 . . . but in my experience I have found that the moment the idea of performing any act in that procedure comes to him, his habit of "end-gaining" causes him to try to "do" the act in the habitual way that feels right, . . .

The Use of the Self by F. Matthias Alexander (Methuen, 1932) page 63

How could it be otherwise when "end-gaining" is a universal habit?

The Use of the Self by F. Matthias Alexander (Methuen, 1932) page 74 fn

I have also shewn how the golfer and stutterer of my illustrations, though constantly warned that the habit of end-gaining would be the greatest difficulty they would have to contend against in making the changes in themselves that they desired, were still unable, when the moment came to gain their particular end, to resist the stimulus to gain that end immediately, . . .

The Use of the Self by F. Matthias Alexander (Methuen, 1932) page 114

This end-gaining business has got to such a point – it's worse than a drug.

"Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 196

The stimulus sets in motion a certain manner of use of himself, and the way he reacts is determined by this manner of use, and in a lesser degree by the comparative strength or weakness of the stimulus in its effect upon it. In this case there is one stimulus to reaction – his desire or need to employ tools or instruments as the means whereby he can gain his end.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 5

Here, even with the help of the very best possible "means whereby," success in gaining their end depends upon the manner of their reaction not to one, but to several stimuli of varying intensity.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 5

According to the first or end-gaining conception, all that is necessary when an end is desired is to proceed to employ the different parts of the organism in the manner which our feeling dictates as necessary for the carrying out of the movements required for gaining the end, irrespective of any harmful effects due to misuse of the self during the process; . . .

It will be seen therefore that end-gaining involves the conception and procedure of going direct for an end without consideration as to whether the "means-whereby" to be employed are the best for the purpose, or as to whether there should be substituted for these, new and improved "means-whereby" which, in their employment, would necessarily involve change in the manner of use of the self. This end-gaining plan is one of trial and error, . . .

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 11, section on "End-gaining and Means-Whereby"

It is not possible to set down full details of the stages this pupil passed through before he learned to inhibit his end-gaining habit and to modify the undue and harmful tension which he exerted throughout his organism, . . .

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 27

End-gaining in sport, as in every sphere of life, is in the long view a delusion and a snare.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 53

In this way man, in the fundamental sphere of activity within the self, defeats his own ends, and his habit of end-gaining is so deeply ingrained that it persists as a menace to him in his relations with the body politic and the outside world.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 55

The end-gaining outlook, which has been and still is almost universal, must therefore pass and give way to a new outlook, in which allowance is made for the time required for the consideration and for the working out of the means whereby any particular change can be made.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 65-66

To begin with, the methods of training and education in which he is versed have developed in him a habit of end-gaining through a too quick and unthinking response to stimuli, . . .

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 80

According to my experience, although a pupil may believe or assert that he has reasoned out why he should not give consent to a certain act and consequently desires to inhibit his habitual reaction, he is clearly more concerned at the moment with gaining his end (i.e., carrying out his teacher's instructions, hoping to be right and fearing to be wrong) than with the inhibition of his habitual reaction to the teacher's request.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 81

These tendencies, combined with that of a too quick and unthinking reaction on his part due to his becoming a confirmed end-gainer, must continue to block his way to success in his attempts to make changes, and to control his reactions.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 91

During recent years a steadily increasing number of people have come to appreciate that the end-gaining and unreasoned procedures inherent in our present plan of civilization have had harmful effects, resulting in an interference with our manner of use and a gradual lowering in the standard of our general functioning; . . .

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 99-100

This means that in each attempt to gain an end in learning or playing their games or in pursuing their art or craft they are doing a great deal to lessen their chance of success by cultivating undesirable habits of use in their trial-and-error efforts to gain their end.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 161

Wherever or whenever a dog is enclosed it will repeat its habitual tactics (response) of smelling, pressing, nosing, on the trial-and-error plan, with the end in view of trying to find a weak spot which it can tear down or squeeze through or jump over in order to achieve its freedom (end).

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 176

This should not surprise anyone who remembers that in most fields of activity man's craze is for speed and for the short view, because he has become possessed by the non-stop attitude and outlook: he is a confirmed end-gainer, without respect to the nature of the means whereby he attempts to gain his desired end even when he wishes to employ new means whereby he could change his habits of thought and action.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 181

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