inhibition, inhibit, inhibiting, inhibitory

. . . 7. that the orders to be dictated by the teacher and mentally rehearsed by the pupil are of two kinds:

a. concerning definite inhibition
b. concerning definite performance . . .

"Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 83

It is, therefore, as necessary to order the inhibition of incorrect and unconsciously performed acts as to give orders which will secure the co-ordinated use of the mechanisms involved. Therefore, when the teacher has discovered the errors unconsciously committed by the pupil when beginning to rehearse the correct orders, he will draw attention to them, and give a definite order concerning what is not to be done, e.g. the peculiar bad habit, perhaps of a lifetime. This negative order must precede all positive commands. In other words, the order or orders concerning what is not to be done are to be considered as primary, and those concerning what is to be done as secondary.

"Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 83

With a pupil who is mentally receptive, and who adequately employs his power of inhibition prior to the correct rehearsal of the orders, a skilful teacher may almost perform miracles.

"Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 84

. . . 5. Defective Inhibition. The practical teacher finds all pupils more or less hampered by lack of inhibitory control, the possession of which would make re-education and co-ordination from the pupil's standpoint comparatively easy.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 15

I come now to the point which marks the differentiation of man from the animal world, and which is first clearly evidenced in the use of the reasoning, intellectual powers of inhibition.

Now it is evident that in the earlier stages of man's development the inhibition of the subconscious animal powers was frequently a source of danger and of death.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 22

It is true that we have evidence of conscious inhibition in a pure state of nature. The wild cat stalking its quarry inhibits the desire to spring prematurely, and controls to a deliberate end its eagerness for the instant gratification of a natural appetite. But in this, and in the many other similar instances, such instinctive acts of inhibition have been developed through long ages of necessity.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 23

As soon as any act was proscribed and punishment meted out for its performance, or as soon as a reward was consciously sought – though its attainment necessitated realized, personal danger – there must have been a deliberate, conscious inhibition of natural desires, which in its turn enforced a similar restraint of muscular, physical functioning.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 23

Fortunately for us there is not a single one of these habits of mind, with their resultant habits of body, which may not be altered by the inculcation of those principles concerning the true poise of the body which I have called the principles of mechanical advantage,* used in co-operation with an understanding of the inhibitory and volitional powers of the objective mind, by which means these deterrent habits can be raised to conscious control.
Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 53

When this has been done he must proceed to inhibit the guiding sensations which cause him to use the mechanism imperfectly; . . .

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 58

The desire to stiffen the neck muscles should be inhibited as a preliminary (which is not the same thing at all as a direct order to relax the muscles themselves), and . . .

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 59

The fundamental principle which we call evolution demands that every human being shall be enabled to make this analysis, so that he may differentiate between the impulses springing from his subconsciousness (instinct - inhibition) and the conceptions created in his reasoning, conscious mind.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 117

  . . . there must be a clear differentiation in his mind between the giving of the order and the performance of the act ordered and carried out through the medium of the muscles. The whole principles of volition and inhibition are implicit in the recognition of this differentiation.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 126

 . . . that is to say, the instructor must move the parts in question while the subject attends to the inhibition of all muscular movements.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 132

  . . . 2. When he has been made aware of these defects, he can be taught to inhibit the faulty movements, . . .

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 139

The subconscious jerkings and contortions pointed out one by one are patiently inhibited by the pupil, sometimes directly, but more often by the explicit use, under my direction, of guiding orders which gradually co-ordinate and remedy the whole faulty system of the pupil's muscular action. One by one the wrong actions and reactions are inhibited, . . .

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 143

But instead of employing inhibition, he adds to his difficulties by renewing his efforts on the old basis to put right what he is told is wrong, and he actually employs increased force in accordance with his own estimate of the amount needed to perform the act. And why so? Chiefly because the ordinary human being has lost the habit of inhibition, and because he is guided here by his sense of feeling, in this connection the most unreliable guide.

When it is explained to such a pupil that inhibition is the first step in his re-education, that his apprehensive fear that he may be doing wrong and his intense desire to do right are the secrets of his failure, he will invariably endeavour to prevent himself from doing anything, by exerting force usually in the opposite direction.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 158

This can be done by an expert manipulator who is able to diagnose the erroneous preconceived ideas of the person concerned, and cause the pupil to inhibit them while employing the position of mechanical advantage.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 184

  . . . the whole purpose of the re-educatory method I advocate is to bring back these muscles into play, not by physical exercises, but by the employment of a position of mechanical advantage and the repetition of the correct inhibiting and guiding mental orders by the pupil, and the correct manipulation and direction by the teacher, until the two psycho-physical factors become an established psycho-physical habit.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 185

I shall confine this consideration of man's development to three stages:

  1. the stage when he was guided chieþy by sensory appreciation;
  2. the stage when he was developing the ability to inhibit in specific spheres, and was still, as we say, "physically fit";
  3. the stage when he had still further developed this inhibitory power in specific spheres, but had recognized a lower standard of "physical" fitness which called for a remedy.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 47

With every advance and with every change which he made in his environment, he began to put into practice a reasoning inhibition which enabled him, within certain well-defined limits, to master or modify for his own purposes the desires and tendencies of that sensory mechanism upon which up to that time he had depended entirely for judgement and direction.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 50

. . . also a fixed belief (based on subconscious guidance) that, if a pupil is corrected for a defect, he should be taught to do something in order to correct it, instead of being taught, as a first principle, how to prevent (inhibition) the wrong thing from being done.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) pages 96-97

And so it comes about that, when a pupil is faced with the alternative of using his mechanisms badly and "feeling right," or of using them well and "feeling wrong," he is apt, as we say, to lose his head, does not stop, therefore, to consider (that is, inhibit) and falls back upon "feeling right."

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 100

The words "volition" and "inhibition" are in constant use in these pages and I wish at this point to make it clearly understood that they are used merely as names for two respective acts, volition standing for the act of responding to some stimulus (or stimuli) to psycho-physical action (doing), and inhibition standing for the act of refusing to respond to some stimulus (or stimuli) to psycho-physical action (not doing). In other words, volition is used to name what we intend to do, and inhibition to name what we refuse to do-that is, to name what we wish to hold in check, what we wish to prevent.
We are not interested here in any controversy concerned with the problem as to whether or not volition and inhibition are different manifestations of the same force, or even as to what this force is, any more than the engineer who is using electricity as a power to a particular end is immediately interested as to what electricity is.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) pages 103-104

In no sphere, however, has the lack of inhibitory development been fraught with such danger as in matters concerned with the actual use of the psycho-physical mechanism in the activities of everyday life, for the lack of this development tends to produce in the individual a state of unbalanced psycho-physical functioning throughout the whole organism.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 104

This procedure constitutes the means whereby the teacher makes it possible for the pupil to prevent (inhibition) the misdirected activities which are causing his psycho-physical imperfections. In this work the inhibitory process must take first place, and remain the primary factor in each and every new experience which is to be gained and become established during the cultivation and development of reliable sensory appreciation upon which a satisfactory standard of co-ordination depends.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 111

If, on the other hand, the pupil stops himself from going to work in his usual way (inhibition), and proceeds to replace his old subconscious means by the new conscious means which his teacher has given him, . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 112 

The teacher further explains that, as the pupil's sensory appreciation is unreliable,* it is unlikely that he will be able to do anything himself to remedy these defects, but that if he will inhibit his desire to stiffen his neck, and give himself the guiding orders or directions to relax it, the teacher will be able by means of manipulation to bring about such a general readjustment of his body that, as a result, his neck will be relaxed.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) pages 114-115

The point that is new in the scheme we are considering is that the pupil is asked consciously to give himself orders, evolved from a consideration of the requirements, not of a subconscious, but of a conscious, reasoning use of the organism, orders and directions, moreover, the satisfactory employment of which depends on the pupil's clear understanding (1) as to which of these orders are primary, to be given, but not to be carried out (inhibition), and (2) as to which are to follow and to be actually carried out.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 115

Our discussion of inhibition in the foregoing leads us to the consideration of the individual's ability to wait (inhibit)* before reacting to a stimulus (or stimuli) to pursue some "end" in the ordinary way of life, and it may be of interest to give some facts in regard to the experiences in this connection of people taking lessons in speaking, breathing, singing, etc.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 117

The teacher therefore asks him to perform:

(1) an inhibitory act, by inhibiting "his way" of taking breath-in other words, by preventing or holding in check, in connection with the act, the wrong subconscious guidance and direction, which constitutes the bad habit he has formed when taking breath at the end of each sentence.
(2) a volitionary act, . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 118

But if the pupil attacks his difficulties-i.e., his general condition of mal-co-ordination-by means of re-education on a plane of constructive, conscious control, he can be helped to overcome them by learning, firstly, to hold in check his subconscious desire to "take breath" at the end of each phrase (inhibitory act), and, secondly, to give the guiding orders and directions in connection with the correct psycho-mechanics of respiration (volitionary act).
This pupil also will probably make the objection that he cannot pause, giving as his reason that if he pauses he cannot keep time in his song. This objection, of course, will not hold any more than the previous one, for when once the necessary control has been gained, the pause required for inhibition and for giving the necessary orders will only be momentary.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 119

When this happens, the teacher must point out to the pupil that he has not quite comprehended what is required of him, and he must again place the whole position before the pupil, and from as many angles as possible, until he is certain that the pupil understands that the primary orders which he is asked to give are preventive orders, and that if he gives these preventive orders (inhibition of the old misdirected activities), and then proceeds to give the new ones, his spine will be kept at its greatest possible length (not shortened), whilst the body will be moved forward from the hips easily and satisfactorily, without interfering with the generally relative position of the torso (except in the matter of angle) just as a door moves on its hinges.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 126

The points I wish to emphasize in this connection are: (1) that the process of inhibition involved is employed in connection with ideas directly associated with the gaining of "ends," these ideas being the response to a stimulus (or stimuli) arising from some primary desire or need, and (2)-and this is all-important-that the stimulus (or stimuli) to inhibit this response comes from without, and the process of inhibition is forced upon the pupil. This means that his desire is thwarted in consequence of compliance with a command from an outside authority, and this could account for the disturbed emotional conditions associated with what is known as suppression.

Now the inhibitory process involved in my technique has little in common with that to which reference has just been made. For the idea concerned with inhibition in my technique is conceived on a general and preventive basis, and the process of inhibition involved is employed primarily in connection with ideas which are dissociated from any direct attempt to gain an "end," but associated instead with that indirect procedure inseparable from the practical application of the principles concerned with the means whereby an end may be gained. These ideas are the response to a stimulus (or stimuli) arising from a reasoned, constructive conscious understanding and acceptance by the pupil of the principles concerned with the "means-whereby," and as the procedure concerned with the application of these principles involves the prevention of "end-gaining" acts, the performance of which is associated with misdirected activities, it follows that the pupil's acceptance of the need for and efficacy of such procedure includes also his acceptance of the principle of inhibition of primary desires concerned with such "end-gaining" acts. This, again, really means that in the application of my technique the process of inhibition-that is, the act of refusing to respond to the primary desire to gain an "end"-becomes the act of responding (volitionary act) to the conscious reasoned desire to employ the means whereby that "end" may be gained.

The stimulus to inhibit, therefore, in this case comes from within, and the process of inhibition is not forced upon the pupil. This means that the pupil's desire or desires will be satisfied, not thwarted, and that there will be present desirable emotional and other psycho-physical conditions which do not make for what is known as suppression in any form.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) pages 131-132

When the human creature's activities are on a plane of constructive, conscious control, he will have reached a standard of development and use of the processes of inhibition (as outlined in the technique which I advocate) which will enable him to apply in practice to his activities in the outside world the very principles concerned with the processes of inhibition which he has applied to the use of his psycho-physical self, with accruing benefit in both spheres of application.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 132

To this end the teacher will first name the preventive guiding orders or directions which the pupil is to give to himself in the way of inhibiting the deceptive guiding sensations concerned with the defective use of the mechanisms responsible for what we call bad habits in breathing.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 140

In such a person, the psycho-physical processes called "habits" are governed by moderation, and his inhibitory processes are adequately developed in all spheres of activity. Their use is not limited to those comparatively few spheres where it was considered necessary to establish taboos during the early and later periods of man's struggle with the problems which arose in the various stages of the civilizing process. In these spheres there has been a harmful and exaggerated development of the inhibitory processes, often causing virtues to become almost vices, whilst in other spheres there has been a correspondingly harmful lack of the development of inhibition, particularly in those spheres connected with the use of the psycho-physical mechanisms in practical activity. This represents an unbalanced use of this wonderful process of inhibition, and tends to produce, as a general result, a state of unbalanced psycho-physical functioning throughout the whole organism, and to establish what we shall refer to as "the unduly excited reflex" process.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 143

When the subject is more or less familiar with these inhibitory experiences, we go on to give him a knowledge of the new and correct directive and guiding orders which, with the aid of manipulation, are to bring about the satisfactory use of the mechanisms in a sitting, prone or other position.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 159

The habit of attempting to perform an act before the directing and guiding orders concerned have been memorized is, in such a case, associated with an inadequate use of the processes of inhibition as compared with those of volition; therefore, when the pupil is brought face to face with the new psycho-physical experiences, his inhibitory processes are ineffective. This means that he is gradually cultivating within himself an unbalanced psycho-physical condition in which the so-called "mental" impressions he receives during the act of learning are unduly faint and unreliable.

In order to restore balance in such a case, it is necessary first to develop a conscious, reasoning inhibition (prevention). To this end, the person concerned must learn to say "No" to every stimulus to psycho-physical activity until he has taken time to consider what are the reasonable means whereby the end he desires can be achieved, and he must then repeat and memorize the orders relative to these means before employing them in guiding and directing the mechanisms essential to the particular psycho-physical act to be performed.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 184

One cannot forget either the unfamiliar but satisfactory manifestations of the child when he becomes able to inhibit - that is, to say "No" to some stimulus to misdirected activity (which in the case of the last illustration would be to say "No" to his subconscious desire to throw back his head and stiffen his neck)-and then, with an expression born of confidence, to give the orders or directions, which are the result of a reasoned conception of his correct "means-whereby," the whole process tending to prevent the over-excitement of the fear reflexes.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 190

Many people would take exception to the word "inhibition," but this inhibition is not the inhibition that we usually hear of. This good pupil: I have explained to him before that he cannot stop those old subconscious habits unless he inhibits the original request that I make to him, and he consents to do that. Therefore, it is not an inhibition associated with suppression. He consents to do it.

Lecture: "An Unrecognized Principle" (1925) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 148

Clearly, to "feel" or think I had inhibited the old instinctive reaction was no proof that I had really done so, and I must find some way of "knowing."

The Use of the Self by F. Matthias Alexander (Methuen, 1932) page 31

I must at all costs work out some plan by which to obtain concrete proof that my instinctive reaction to the stimulus to gain my end remained inhibited, while I projected in their sequence the directions for the employment of the new use at the critical moment of gaining that end.

The Use of the Self by F. Matthias Alexander (Methuen, 1932) page 33

In proportion as he was successful in inhibiting his immediate response to any stimulus, he became able to defeat his desire to gain his ends in the way that felt right to him, and as long as he continued this inhibition, I on my side was able to repeat for him, until they became familiar, the new sensory experiences associated with an improved general use of his mechanisms, including the right use of his tongue and lips.

The Use of the Self by F. Matthias Alexander (Methuen, 1932) pages 80-81

For this reason, all those who wish to change something in themselves must learn to make it a principle of life to inhibit their immediate reaction to any stimulus to gain a desired end, and, in order to give themselves the opportunity of refusing to fall back upon the familiar sensory experiences of their old habitual use in order to gain it, they must continue this inhibition whilst they employ the new direction of their use.

The Use of the Self by F. Matthias Alexander (Methuen, 1932) page 115

Anyone who will do me the justice to read carefully the first chapter of my book (especially pages 33 to 35), where I describe in detail the application of my technique, must see that in every instance the preliminary step is the inhibition of any misdirection of use that has become habitual, and that therefore such a method presupposes of necessity the elimination of what is involved in any scheme of ''exercises," whether ''energetic" or otherwise, or of what Dr Brock calls "psycho-physical gymnastics."

Letter: "The Use of the Self–2" (1932) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 133

You have inhibited the wrong movements at the beginning, and giving the new orders as you make the movement, how can you be wrong?

"Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 200

You come to learn to inhibit and to direct your activity. You learn, first, to inhibit the habitual reaction to certain classes of stimuli, and second, to direct yourself consciously in such a way as to affect certain muscular pulls, which processes bring about a new reaction to these stimuli. Boiled down, it all comes to inhibiting a particular reaction to a given stimulus.

"Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 203

This is an indirect procedure, and, as has already been shown, it involves the inhibition of familiar messages responsible for habitual familiar activity, and the substituting for these of unfamiliar messages responsible for new and unfamiliar activity.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 12

For not only was the deformity being removed and the wrong axis of the head prevented, but, most significant of all, the reflex spasm which Dr Caldwell states "occurs with the onset of arthritis of the spine" was being consistently inhibited, and the associated pain grew less and less until there was permanent relief.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 20

Dr Caldwell's next statement, therefore, that "Alexander teaches how to inhibit the reflex spasm, that is the real secret," is most significant, for it shows that he understands why the particular means employed in my technique in Mr B.'s case came about as an indirect result of the pupil's learning to inhibit the wrong employment of the primary control of his use. When he became experienced in inhibiting the misdirection which led to the wrong employment of the primary control, and could maintain the resultant new manner of use when responding to any stimulus to activity in his daily life, his reaction no longer resulted in overaction of the muscle group or reflex spasm.

Such a change could not have been brought about without the inhibition of his habitual manner of use, for this was associated with misdirection and the high degree of muscle tension throughout the organism, and was indirectly responsible for much of the overaction of the muscle groups resulting in the spasm.* The change made in his use through the inhibition of this misdirection brought about many changes in conditions, including a lowering of the standard of muscle tension throughout the organism generally, and, with it, a reduction of the undue tension involved in the spasm.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 22

My experiences, therefore, convinced me that in any attempt to control habitual reaction the need to work to a new principle asserts itself, the principle, namely, of inhibiting our habitual desire to go straight to our end trusting to feeling for guidance, and then of employing only those "means-whereby" which indirectly bring about the desired change in our habitual reaction-the end.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 25

It was the inhibition of the misdirection of my use which finally enabled me to regain the proper functioning of my voice, and it was this same inhibitory process at work which, in the case of osteo-arthritis, led in time to what Dr Caldwell described as the "inhibition of the reflex spasm."

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 26

The pupil who, with the aid of his teacher, learns to employ these procedures as the means of gaining the end he desires, begins a process of change by starting with the inhibition of the misdirection of his habitual employment of the primary control associated with his harmful functioning.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 39

As long as we adhere in everything we do to the principle of consciously inhibiting interference with the employment of the primary control, then our ordinary daily activities can be made a constant means of psycho-physical development in its fullest sense.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 52

In the employment of my technique this added difficulty is taken into account from the start of the lessons, and hence, in any attempt to help a pupil to change habitual reaction, I begin with procedures that involve only simple activities on the pupil's part, such as sitting and rising from a chair, in order to give him in the easiest way the opportunity to inhibit his habitual response when any stimulus to activity comes to him.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 76

By adhering to this decision the pupil inhibits his immediate response, and therefore cuts off at its source his habitual reaction to the stimulus of the teacher's request, . . . .

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 79

According to my experience, although a pupil may believe or assert that he has reasoned out why he should not give consent to a certain act and consequently desires to inhibit his habitual reaction, he is clearly more concerned at the moment with gaining his end (i.e., carrying out his teacher's instructions, hoping to be right and fearing to be wrong) than with the inhibition of his habitual reaction to the teacher's request.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 81

The reader will now see that the technique is based upon the inhibition of the habitual wrong use – i.e., the refusal to react to a stimulus in the usual way – and that the principle of prevention is strictly adhered to from the beginning.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 83

As long as he inhibits the sending of the old messages the old lines of communication are not used, and as he becomes more and more versed in the procedures of the technique the tendency to make use of them decreases, as does his dependence upon his feeling of rightness associated with them.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 83

The primary procedure in the technique necessary for gaining these experiences is the inhibition, at a given stimulus, of our habitual reflex activity.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 86 - subchapter on inhibition

Inhibition is a human potentiality of the utmost value in any attempt to make changes in the human self, and my experience has convinced me that it is the potentiality most in need of development. I have found that if a pupil can inhibit his habitual reactions even moderately well when faced with unfamiliar procedures, remarkable changes in his use and functioning can be made in a very short time, changes which judged by ordinary results would seem impossible.

The employment of inhibition calls for the exercise of memory and awareness – the former for remembering the procedures involved in the technique and the proper sequence in which they should be used, and the latter in the recognition of what is happening. . . .

My technique is based on inhibition, the inhibition of undesirable, unwanted responses to stimuli, and hence it is primarily a technique for the development of the control of human reaction.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 87-88 - subchapter on inhibition

He does not, therefore, try to suppress his desire to indulge in this habit by sheer force of his will-to-do, but instead learns to approach his problem indirectly by inhibiting his habitual manner of use in reacting to the old stimulus.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 97

Such help involves a form of non-doing which must not be confused with passivity, and which is fundamental because it prevents the self from doing itself harm by misdirection of energy and uncontrolled reaction; it is an act of inhibition which comes into play when, for instance, in response to a given stimulus, we refuse to give consent to certain activity, and thus prevent ourselves from sending those messages which would ordinarily bring about the habitual reaction resulting in the "doing" within the self of what we no longer wish to "do."

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 101

  . . . for the employment of the primary control in my technique is inseparable from the inhibitory procedures necessary to the reconditioning of the reflexes and to integration of the "total pattern" involving the same procedures in a unified process.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 116

The acceptance of the need of new "means-whereby" for the carrying out of the desired "doing," the inhibition of familiar ways and all that is necessary for the new way of doing things, call for thinking along unfamiliar lines, and for a wide range of human experiences which I believe to be indispensable to man's growth and development.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 150

 . . . unless they are given that knowledge of the use of the self which includes the means whereby (means appropriate) they are enabled to inhibit the habitual (automatic) reaction to the stimuli of daily living, which, as I have been teaching since the beginning, must be inhibited before any such fundamental change can be brought about in the psycho-physical organism a . . .

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 178

This demands the employment of a technique which makes possible the gaining of experience in knowing how to stop (prevention-inhibition) when dominated by the inþuence of impulsive uncontrolled reaction. Provision is made for this by procedures in the technique here described as the means whereby those who need it can be helped to gradually change and improve the control of their reaction. The first step in the procedure is an inhibitory (preventive) one – that of refusing to give consent to the habitual (subconscious) reaction; and it is the basic beginning of the means whereby one may change and control reaction. The next step is a volitionary one – that of consenting to employ the second procedure and also the succeeding procedures by a continuity of conscious directions in giving consent to new procedures whilst still withholding consent to the habitual reaction (the first procedure). Thus the first procedure, which is an inhibitory act, in being linked with the other procedures, becomes the beginning of a volitionary act which involves thinking in activity and enables us to gradually change and improve the general use and functioning which is a manifestation of the nature of our reaction.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 181-182

In our way you get the result in a more legitimate way, and the result is lasting because by repeating the inhibition of a particular stimulus you really are getting the beginning of the control of human reaction.

 St. Dunstan's Lecture (1949) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 186

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