order, ordering

It is the teacher who should have the responsibility of certain detailed orders, the literal carrying out of which will ensure for the pupil what is then the correct standing position for him.

"Why 'Deep Breathing' and Physical Culture Exercises do more Harm than Good" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 74

Tell him, therefore, not to breathe, but enable him to obtain those mechanical advantages which give atmospheric pressure its opportunity – i.e. such relaxation of certain parts, tensing the muscles of others, and ordering the head upwards as will cause the spine to assume a more normal position.

"Why 'Deep Breathing' and Physical Culture Exercises do more Harm than Good" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 75

If he is told to "stand up straight" he will at once make undue physical effort to carry out the order thus crudely given, with the result that the shoulders will be thrown backward and upward, the shoulder-blades still further protruded, and the front and upper parts of the chest unduly elevated and expanded.

"Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 82

. . . 6. that in order to obviate the evils enunciated in the last two postulates the teacher must himself place the pupils in a position of mechanical advantage, from which the pupil, by the mere mental rehearsal of orders which the teacher will dictate, can ensure the posture specifically correct for himself, although he is not, as yet, conscious of what that posture is.

"Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 82

The teacher, having decided upon the orders necessary for securing the elongation of the spine, the freedom of the neck (i.e. requisite natural laxness) and other conditions desirable to the particular case in hand, will then ask the pupil to rehearse them mentally, at the same time that he himself renders assistance by the skilful use of his hands.

"Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 82-83

. . . 7. that the orders to be dictated by the teacher and mentally rehearsed by the pupil are of two kinds:
a. concerning definite inhibition
b. concerning definite performance . . .

"Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 83

This negative order must precede all positive commands. In other words, the order or orders concerning what is not to be done are to be considered as primary, and those concerning what is to be done as secondary.

"Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 83

With a pupil who is mentally receptive, and who adequately employs his power of inhibition prior to the correct rehearsal of the orders, a skilful teacher may almost perform miracles.

"Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1908) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 84

Then the teacher must ask the pupil to rehearse or give the mental orders necessary to the particular person in question, and such mental orders or desires must be those which will be in accordance with the correct movements which the teacher will ensure for the pupil during the manipulation which follows.

"Supplement to Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1910) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 103

Then the pupil should be told to order or desire relaxation of the muscles of the arm and to grip the back of the chair gently but firmly.

"Supplement to Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1910) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 103

As an example: the pupil should rehearse the order for the relaxation of the neck and the raising of the head while the teacher opens his (the pupil's) mouth, while all the parts concerned are caused to co-ordinate correctly.

>"Supplement to Re-Education of the Kinæsthetic Systems" (1910) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 105

Take a person who, prior to re-education, has the habit of putting the head back whenever an attempt is made to put the shoulders back. Ask this person to put the head forward and keep the shoulders still, and it will be found that as a rule he fails to carry out the order, and moves his shoulders also.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 15

And this apprehension must precede and be preparatory to any conception of "speaking," during the application of all the guiding orders involved. In originating some new idea which is to take the place of the old idea of drawing down the upper lip, it may be necessary at first to break the old association by means of some new order, such as deliberately to draw the lip up, to open the mouth, or to make some similar muscular act previously unfamiliar in its application to the act of speaking. This new order is then substituted for the command to speak. X is told not to speak but to draw up his lip, open his mouth, etc.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 34

For when real conscious control has been obtained, a "habit" need never become fixed. It is not truly a habit at all, but an order or series of orders given to the subordinate controls of the body, which orders will be carried out until countermanded.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 54

1. The conscious, intelligently realized, guiding orders are such as may be continued for all time, becoming more effective year by year until they are established as the real and fundamental guidance and control necessary to that which we understand by the words growth and evolution.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 54

He has acquired conscious control of that working, it is true, but once that control has been mastered, the actual movements that follow are given in charge of the "subconscious self," although always on the understanding that a counter order may be given at any moment if necessary. Until, however, such counter order is given, if ever it need be given, the working of the lungs is for all intents and purpose subconscious, though it may be elevated to the level of the conscious at any moment.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 57

When this has been done he must proceed to inhibit the guiding sensations which cause him to use the mechanism imperfectly; he must apprehend the position of mechanical advantage, and then by using the new correct guiding sensations or orders, he will be able to bring about the proper use of his muscular mechanism with perfect ease.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 58

The desire to stiffen the neck muscles should be inhibited as a preliminary (which is not the same thing at all as a direct order to relax the muscles themselves), and then the true uses of the muscular mechanism, i.e., the means of placing the body in a position of mechanical advantage, must be studied, when the work will naturally devolve on those muscles intended to carry it out, and the neck will be relaxed unconsciously. In this case the conscious orders, by which I mean the orders given to the right muscles, are preventive orders, and the due sequence of cause and effect is maintained.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), pages 59-60

As a result his mind is very fully occupied with this unusual condition of the body which can be maintained only by repeated orders from the objective mind.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 63

For this very reason, all aid to progressive development must conform to the principle of the projection of guiding orders and controls in the right direction or directions, with the simultaneous employment of positions of mechanical advantage, irrespective of the correctness or otherwise of the immediate result.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 87

In the performance of any muscular action by conscious guidance and control there are four essential stages:

. . .
3. the new and conscious mental orders which will set in motion the muscular mechanism essential to the correct performance of the action;
4. the movements (contractions and expansions) of the muscles which carry out the mental orders.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 124

He must also be taught to inhibit, and, finally, to eradicate these preconceived ideas and the mental order or series of orders which follow from them. Only then can he give the correct guiding orders as next described.

In the third place, then, he must learn to give the correct mental orders to the mechanisms involved, and there must be a clear differentiation in his mind between the giving of the order and the performance of the act ordered and carried out through the medium of the muscles.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 126

In the fourth place, when the correct guiding orders have been practised and given by the mind – a result attained by attention and the instruction of the teacher – the muscles involved will come into play in different combinations under the control of conscious guidance, and a reasoned act will take the place of the series of habitual, unconsidered movements which have resulted in the deformation of the body. And it must be kept clearly in mind that the whole of the old series of movements has been correlated and compacted into one indivisible and rigid sequence which has invariably followed the one mental order that started the train; such an order, for instance, as "Stand upright."

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 127

My reader must not fail to remember that mental conceptions are the stimuli to the ideo-motor centre which passes on the subconscious or conscious guiding orders to the mechanism. In dealing with human defects or imperfections we must consider the inherited subconscious conceptions associated with the mechanisms involved, and also the conceptions which are to be the forerunners of the ideo-motor guiding orders connected with the new and correct use of the different mechanisms.

In order to establish successfully the latter (correct conception), we must first inhibit the former (incorrect conception), and from the ideo-motor centre project the new and different directing orders which are to influence the complexes involved, gradually eradicating the tendency to employ the incorrect ones, and steadily building up those which are correct and reliable.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 131

I do not therefore, in teaching him, actually order him to lengthen his spine by performing any explicit action, but I cause him to rehearse the correct guiding orders, and after placing him in a position of mechanical advantage I am able by my manipulation to bring about, directly or indirectly as the case may be, the desired flexibility and extension.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 133

Note that the relaxing was not brought about by a preliminary order to relax, an action which entailed processes of which he had no true consciousness and over which therefore he had no control.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 135

  1. Whenever a person speaks to you, asking a question or in any way trying to open up a conversation, you must as a primary principle refuse to answer by mentally saying No. (This will hold in check the old subconscious orders – the bad habit of moving the arm. It constitutes the inhibition of the old errors before attempting to speak.)
  2. Then give the new and correct orders to your general co-ordinations and command the "means whereby" of the act of correct and controlled speaking.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 136

It depends on the giving of orders on the "end-gaining" principle – such an order, for instance, as "Swing up and down again in the same orbit," without consideration of the "means whereby";. . .

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 139

My own treatment, then, is: first to observe and analyse and bring about a proper working of the machinery in general (nature does not work in parts but as a whole); then to point out the first guiding order or orders to be brought into play by the pupil – namely, the inhibiting of the tension of the muscles working the lower jaw.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 142

They do not observe or reflect that an inhibition of the subconscious orders which cause the mechanisms to keep the mouth closed will bring about such a relaxation of that muscular tension as will allow the jaw to drop.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), pages 143-144

The process is this: apprehensively he tries to do what he thinks his teacher desires him to do. The old, wrong, subconscious orders follow in their usual channels, and before he realizes the fact he is performing the act in the old, wrong manner. Therefore he must learn to inhibit these incorrect subconscious orders, which result in undue physical tension and the imperfect use of his muscles.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), pages 157-158

In order to obviate the evils enunciated in the last two postulates, the teacher must himself place the pupil in a position of mechanical advantage,* from which the pupil, by the mere mental rehearsal of orders which the teacher will dictate, can ensure the posture specifically correct for himself, although he is not, as yet, conscious of what that posture is.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 170

Firstly, then, rid the mind of the idea of sitting down, and consider the exercise and each order independently of the final consequence they entail. . . . Thirdly, order the neck to relax, and at the same time order the head forward and up. (Note that to "order" the muscles of the neck to relax does not mean "allow the head to fall forward on the chest." The order suggested is merely a mental preventive to the erroneous preconceived idea.) Fourthly, keep clearly in the mind the general idea of the lengthening of the body which is a direct consequence of the third series of orders. And fifthly, order simultaneously the hips to move backwards and the knees to bend, the knees and hip-joints acting as hinges. During this act a mental order must be given to widen the back. When this order is fulfilled, the experimenter will find himself sitting in the chair.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), pages 174-175

To refer to my metaphor of the sovereign ruler, you might as well expect a king to order and superintend the detail of his subjects' private life as expect the conscious mind directly to order and superintend every function of the body.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 178

  . . . the whole purpose of the re-educatory method I advocate is to bring back these muscles into play, not by physical exercises, but by the employment of a position of mechanical advantage and the repetition of the correct inhibiting and guiding mental orders by the pupil, and the correct manipulation and direction by the teacher, until the two psycho-physical factors become an established psycho-physical habit.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 185

. . . the standard of functioning depends

  1. upon the degree of correctness of the conception of the act to be performed, and
  2. upon the degree of co-ordinated employment of the guiding and controlling orders or directions, and of the mechanisms involved in carrying out the activities essential to the correct means whereby the act can be performed.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 41

The teacher, having made his diagnosis of the cause or causes of the imperfections or defects which the pupil has developed in the incorrect use of himself, uses expert manipulation to give to the pupil the new sensory experiences required for the satisfactory use of the mechanisms concerned, the while giving him the correct guiding orders or directions which are the counterpart of the new sensory experiences which he is endeavouring to develop by means of his manipulation.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 111

He tells the pupil that, on receiving the directions or guiding orders, he must not attempt to carry them out; that, on the contrary, he must inhibit the desire to do so in the case of each and every order which is given to him. He must instead project the guiding orders as given to him whilst his teacher at the same time, by means of manipulation, will make the required readjustments and bring about the necessary co-ordinations, in this way performing for the pupil the particular movement or movements required, and giving him the new reliable sensory appreciation and the very best opportunity possible to connect the different guiding orders before attempting to put them into practice. This linking-up of the guiding orders or directions is all-important, for it is the counterpart of that linking-up of the parts of the organism which constitutes what we call co-ordination.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 111

. . . given:

  1. the teacher's knowledge of the correct means whereby the particular "end" can be secured;
  2. the pupil's correct apprehension and conscious repetition of the guiding orders or directions relating to these "means-whereby";
  3. the manipulation by the teacher who, with his expert hands, gives to the pupil the reliable sensory appreciation which should result from such directive orders,

it is then merely a matter of time* before the desired end will be secured.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) pages 112-113

All that is asked of him is, when he receives a guiding order, to listen and wait; to wait, because only by waiting can he be certain of preventing himself from relapsing into his old subconscious habits, and to listen, so that he learns to remember gradually and connect up the guiding orders which are the counterpart of the means whereby which the teacher is employing to bring about the desired "end."

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 113

Very few, moreover, have any idea of giving themselves a guiding order or direction without making an attempt to carry it out. They do not separate the order they are asked to give from the act or acts of which it is the forerunner. Therefore, as soon as they are asked to give a certain continuous order, they rush impulsively into action according to their habitual subconscious use of the parts concerned.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 114

Another difficulty which pupils make for themselves is in connection with the giving of guiding orders or directions. They speak sometimes as if it were a strange and new thing to ask them to give themselves orders, forgetting that they have been doing this subconsciously from their earliest days, else they would not be able to stand up without help, much less move about. The point that is new in the scheme we are considering is that the pupil is asked consciously to give himself orders, evolved from a consideration of the requirements, not of a subconscious, but of a conscious, reasoning use of the organism, orders and directions, moreover, the satisfactory employment of which depends on the pupil's clear understanding (1) as to which of these orders are primary, to be given, but not to be carried out (inhibition), and (2) as to which are to follow and to be actually carried out.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 115

It follows, then, that the orders which are to be given, but not to be carried out, are those which, if carried out, would result in the habitual faulty use of the mechanisms. They can therefore be referred to as "preventive orders." All orders which follow preventive orders are to be carried out (at first by the teacher), for if the teaching technique is reliable, such orders will be concerned with the correct means whereby the new and co-ordinated use of the mechanism can be secured.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 116

I have already pointed out that children from the first moment of school life onward manifest a lack of inhibitory development, and the fact that in most cases they learn to obey orders at once,* without stopping to consider the "why and the wherefore" is a contributing factor to this harmful condition.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 116

And so, when pupils insist that giving orders is a difficulty, what they really mean is that because of their long-established habit of reacting quickly and unthinkingly to a direction, a habit fostered by years of training, they find it difficult to stop, to wait, to be content just to give orders and to say "No," when the impulse comes to carry out the orders.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 116

This applies equally,

  1. whether the pupil is in the early stages of his work, where he is asked merely to give orders and to leave the carrying-out of these orders to the teacher;
  2. whether he has reached a later stage where, under his teacher's supervision, he is gradually developing a reliable sensory appreciation upon which he can rely in carrying out the orders himself; or . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 117

The teacher therefore asks him to perform:
. . .
(2) a volitionary act, by giving himself certain orders which are the means whereby a more satisfactory act of inspiration may gradually be cultivated before he attempts to go on to the next sentence.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 118 

This pupil also will probably make the objection that he cannot pause, giving as his reason that if he pauses he cannot keep time in his song. This objection, of course, will not hold any more than the previous one, for when once the necessary control has been gained, the pause required for inhibition and for giving the necessary orders will only be momentary.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 119

The pupil is then asked to give the following preventive orders.

In the way of correct direction and guidance, he is asked to order the neck to relax, to order the head forward and up to lengthen the spine.

It must here be clearly understood that in the previous manipulative and other work done in connection with the technique, the pupil will have been made familiar in theory and practice with Order 1. He is able to give certain orders correctly and also to put them into effect. In the present instance, it is explained to him that the order given is to be merely preventive-a projected wish without any attempt on the pupil's part to carry it out successfully.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) pages 124-125 

The teacher will then renew the request to the pupil to give the orders, and with his hands will command for him the actual performance of the movement, of which these orders are the counterpart.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 126

Great care must be taken to see that the pupil has not interfered with the mechanism of the torso in the effort to take the weight of the arm. This interference can take place in various ways, but it always implies that the pupil has forgotten his orders and has harked back to one or other of his subconscious habits. What is essential here is a co-ordinated use of the arms, and the only way by which he can secure this is, first, by giving the necessary preventive orders, and then by rehearsing the series of new orders given by the teacher, in which the movement of the arms is linked up with the use of the other parts of the body.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 127

To command success, correct experiences in sensory appreciation must follow the giving of correct directive and guiding orders.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 128

At this point the pupil should be asked to reconsider the different means whereby he has been enabled to reach this stage of his work, and to repeat orally the directions and guiding orders exactly in the sequence in which they have been given to him by his teacher, as primary, secondary, and following factors.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 128

This failure to carry out the given orders is due chieþy to the fact that the pupil's sensory appreciation in the matter of due and proper muscular tension is sadly inadequate.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 130

The teacher must make certain that the pupil remembers these guiding orders or directions in the sequence in which they are to be employed.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 140

In this connection it is explained to him that it is the use of the incorrect, subconscious guiding orders to the mechanisms concerned with the act of walking, associated with unreliable sensory appreciation, which has caused the mechanisms to be used imperfectly, resulting in the weakness and difficulties with which we are contending.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 159

For example, suppose a person is in the habit of performing a certain act-the act of sitting in a chair, for instance-with a great deal of unnecessary tension, and suppose his teacher points this out to him, and reasons out with him the means whereby the act can be performed without this unnecessary strain, giving him the necessary directions (series of orders) to this end, and the reliable sensory appreciation which the satisfactory carrying-out of the orders demands.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 173

Suppose, further, that the pupil, instead of following these directions quite simply in the order in which they are given to him, starts, as he calls it, to "concentrate" upon them. What will he really be doing? In a specific way, he will be concentrating upon one order and comparatively neglecting the others, whilst, in a general way, he will be overpowering the new set of conscious orders which he is asked to give in connection with the act of sitting in a chair, by a still more powerful set of orders which are in accordance with his conception of the requirements of the act of concentration.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 173, section on "Concentration and the Sustained (Continuous) Projection of Orders"

Co-ordinated use of the different parts during any evolution calls for the continuous, conscious projection of orders to the different parts involved, the primary order concerned with the guidance and control of the primary part of the act being continued whilst the orders connected with the secondary part of the movement are projected, and so on, however many orders are required (the number of these depending upon the demands of the processes concerned with a particular movement).

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 174, section on "Concentration and the Sustained (Continuous) Projection of Orders"

The projection of continued, conscious orders calls for a broad reasoning attitude so that the subject has not only a clear conception of the orders essential ("means-whereby") for the correct performance of a particular movement, but he can also project these orders in their right relationship one to another, the coordinated series of orders resulting in a coordinated use of the organism.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 174

Co-ordinated use of the different parts during any evolution calls for the continuous, conscious projection of orders to the different parts involved, the primary order concerned with the guidance and control of the primary part of the act being continued whilst the orders connected with the secondary part of the movement are projected, and so on, however many orders are required (the number of these depending upon the demands of the processes concerned with a particular movement).

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 174, section on "Concentration and the Sustained (Continuous) Projection of Orders"

The point of interest in all these considerations lies in the fact that this prevalent belief in concentration goes hand in hand with the acceptance of the "end-gaining" principle, as against the principle of thinking out clearly and connectedly the means whereby an "end" can be secured, and of "bringing the mind to bear" on as many subjects (continuous projections of orders) as is necessary for the purpose.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 176, section on "Concentration and the Sustained (Continuous) Projection of Orders"

Once he gets to the point that I can give him that order and he indulges in non-doing, simply refuses to do anything, I then explain to him the guiding orders which I wish him to deal with. Now it is very difficult for me to give you those guiding orders because they differ, as you will probably understand, in different people, but I can describe to you the central control.

Lecture:"An Unrecognized Principle" (1925) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 148

He says, "No, I am not going to sit down. I am going to order my neck to relax, and allow my knees to go forward and when I touch the chair, I am going to allow the chair to support me. I am not going to slump down," and if he remembers not to do when he touches the chair, he will not slump on the chair.

Lecture:"An Unrecognized Principle" (1925) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 149

"Instead of sitting down," I said, "I want you to give certain orders which will affect the primary control, and then let me, with my hands, do the activity side of it. Allow your knees to go forward and you will find you will be sitting down."

"Bedford Physical Training College Lecture" (1934) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 167

But if we are going to do, not a mechanical exercise, but something real that matters, you have to think out beforehand the means whereby you have to do it, and give the directions or orders for these means whereby, in the form of a wish, as it were, and keep that wish going all through the activity.

"Bedford Physical Training College Lecture" (1934) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 168

Instead, you say, "These are the new messages I have decided to send. I am going to give these new orders and directions, instead of the old ones I have always given," and you must all see that you cannot order your head back while you are sending it messages to go forward.

"Bedford Physical Training College Lecture" (1934) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 168

Give orders before you move and go on giving them as you move.

 "Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 199

You won't fight me if you give your orders. You only fight me because you try to "do" what you think I want you to do and what I am doing.

"Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 200

When you get to the point of giving an order and hoping to God that it won't be carried out, you are making the first step forward.

"Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 200

Go on with the orders right through the whole piece, once, twice, thrice. You have inhibited the wrong movements at the beginning, and giving the new orders as you make the movement, how can you be wrong?

"Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 200

Give your orders, head forward and up, down with the shoulders, widen the back, and make no trouble about it: one thing does the other.

"Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 200

It is of no use to give orders when you have already done the wrong thing. Of course, if the thing you have done is due to a misapprehension in the order, that is another thing. Then you can go back and give another order.

"Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 201

It is no use giving orders whilst you have an idea at the back of your brain of doing something.

"Teaching Aphorisms" in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 201

Editor's note
Alexander does not use "order", "orders", etc. (in the meaning of "directing" etc.) in UoS or UCL (with the exception a quotation from CCC.)

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