Sensory

. . . whereas conscious control (reasoned experience) through re-education, co-ordination and readjustment is the result of the use of the reasoning powers in the conduct of life, by means of which man may fight his abnormal desires for harmful sensory experiences.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 42

The logic of this answer will be readily appreciated by the layman, when he considers the interdependence of every part of the system, for in this case the nerve centres connected with the sensory apparatus of the digestive organs control also the respiratory processes.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996), page 70

On the other hand, in what would ordinarily be considered purely mental spheres, the standard of functioning depends

(1) upon the degree of reliability of the sensory guidance and direction in the use of the mechanisms involved in conveying the stimuli primarily responsible for the psycho-physical processes concerned with conception, . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 41

With every advance and with every change which he made in his environment, he began to put into practice a reasoning inhibition which enabled him, within certain well-defined limits, to master or modify for his own purposes the desires and tendencies of that sensory mechanism upon which up to that time he had depended entirely for judgement and direction.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 50

In the first place, man completely overlooked the fact that the sensory mechanism, upon which he had heretofore entirely depended for guidance in general activity, was no longer registering accurately, and that he could no longer rely, therefore, entirely upon feeling-that is, on instinctive subconscious guidance-for the satisfactory performance of the ordinary acts of life.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 59

Else why should this sphere have been particularly selected for condemnation, seeing that the satisfaction of the needs and desires of the reproductive system is as essential as the satisfaction of the needs and desires of the digestive and assimilative systems to the welfare of the individual and of the race, and that the results of satisfying the sensory desires and needs of these three systems are normal and salutary, as long as moderate use and not abuse is the rule?

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 68-69

For, if his condition of general functioning were normal, his reaction to the particular sensory stimulus would be a normal reaction, not an unreasoning "phobia."

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 77

I merely look at the subject before me as a damaged machine, as it were, note the badly used mechanisms, the imperfect sensory direction and control, and in the light of my experience ask myself, . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 78-79

But in this connection it must always be clearly understood that the correct sensory experiences to be acquired by means of this technique cannot be described in writing or by the spoken word in such a way as to be of practical value.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 94

Furthermore, in order to give these satisfactory sensory experiences, the teacher must himself be in possession of a reliable sensory mechanism and have gained the experience in re-education and co-ordination that is required for a satisfactory readjustment of the organism.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 94

The teacher will therefore advise the pupil to stop relying on his own judgement in these matters, and, instead, to listen to the new instructions, and to allow the teacher to give him by means of manipulation the new correct sensory experiences.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 99

We prophesy, however, that before we have acquired accurate knowledge as to the latter, we may possibly have solved the former by means of that consciously acquired knowledge which is coming to us through the practical understanding of our psycho-sensory potentialities upon which a higher and higher standard of human psycho-physical functioning depends.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 104

We have to recognize, therefore, that our sensory peculiarities are the foundation of what we think of as our opinions, and that, in fact, nine out of ten of the opinions we form are rather the result of what we feel* than what we think.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 107

This latter estimate is, in most cases, too liberal a one, for, as a rule, the slightest touch releases the old sensory activities associated subconsciously in the pupil's conception with the act of "moving forward," . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 125

It should be realized here that, during the course of this work, a process of building is going on, fundamental sensory building, on a general and not a scientific basis.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 127

. . . for the habit of excess will gradually become more firmly established with too frequent repetition of the indulgence of the debauched sensory desires connected, in the case given, with eating and drinking, thus making indulgence the rule and not the exception.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 153

In Man's Supreme Inheritance we have referred to that degenerate state of the organism when the human creature will desire a form of sensory satisfaction through actual pain.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 155

The first time the instructions were given it was obvious that, before the teacher had finished speaking, the pupil was trying to memorize them, as they were given, by a "physical" (sensory) process-i.e., by trying to "feel" the instructions as they were spoken, rather than to acquire them by a process of remembering ("committing to memory," as we say).

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997) page 182

The shoulder went into its place immediately I supplied the sensory activity which brought about those conditions in the working of the whole organism which were present before the shoulder was interfered with.

Lecture: "An Unrecognized Principle" (1925) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 143

Employing the sensory consciousness which I have given him, that man can immediately allow his knees to go forward, can sit in the chair, and give his attention during that act to that direction of the head.

Lecture: "An Unrecognized Principle" (1925) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 149

All that has been left out of my books is the sensory experiences, and no one will ever live on the earth who will be able to convey a clear sensory experience in words or through the sense of hearing. That is practically impossible.

Lecture: "An Unrecognized Principle" (1925) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 154

Ladies and gentlemen, I don't quite know where to start. I should have to go back to the "savage" conditions; I have some experience of the "savage" man living in his static environment, and it is there that we find that the sensory conditions {?} are so acute. I think in my books I have stated why I believe we have gone wrong. It is that, in my opinion, we have emerged from an uncivilized life in which the creature lived in a practically static environment and there we find the whole of the sensory conditions most acute.

Lecture: "An Unrecognized Principle" (1925) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 156

 . . . and I have come to the very, very sound conclusion that if we today could all be given a reliable sensory register in the observation of our own consciousness of what we are doing, three-quarters of the trouble would disappear.

Lecture: "An Unrecognized Principle" (1925) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 159

Despite this past experience and the knowledge that I had gained from it, I now set out on an experiment which brought into play a new use of certain parts and involved sensory experiences that were totally unfamiliar, without its even occurring to me that for this purpose I should need the help of the mirror more than ever.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932) page 16

The whole experience, indeed, convinces me that the prevalence of sensory untrustworthiness is of the utmost significance in relation to the problem of the control of human reaction.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932) page 39

No human being can receive a stimulus except through the sensory mechanisms, and supposing one could prevent the sensory mechanisms from receiving a stimulus, no reaction would be possible and therefore no further activity. Life itself would then cease.
When once it is recognized that every act is a re-action to a stimulus received through the sensory mechanisms, no act can be described as wholly "mental" or wholly "physical."

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932) page 43

The habitual use of his mechanisms which the golfer brings to all his activities, including golf, has always been accompanied by certain sensory experiences (feelings) which, from their lifelong association with this habitual use, have become familiar to him.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932) page 52

  On the other hand, the use of his mechanisms which would involve his keeping his eyes on the ball during the act of making a stroke would be a use entirely contrary to his habitual use and associated with sensory experiences which, being unfamiliar, would "feel wrong" to him; it may therefore be said that he receives no sensory stimulus in that direction.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932) page 52

Reliability of the sensory register is essential to all who would make permanent changes from unsatisfactory to satisfactory conditions of functioning.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932) page 65

For all "trying" starts from some personal conviction that in some way we shall be able to do what we are trying to do, and this conviction, like conviction on any other point, is made possible only by virtue of impressions received through the agency of our sensory processes. We must therefore see that the validity of this conviction is dependent upon the nature of the functioning of our sensory make-up. If this is satisfactory, our sensory register of impressions of what we are doing and experiencing in response to the stimulus to "try" is likely to be a true register; . . .

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932) page 116

  . . . I must point out in reply that since the experiments I there describe are concerned with sensory experiences, this is inevitable, for, unfortunately, as we all know, knowledge concerned with sensory experiences cannot be described by the written or spoken word in any way that will enable those who have not had these experiences to know them "precisely."

Letter: "The Use of the Self–1" (1932) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 131

As every scientific worker knows, the expression of opinion alone is valueless in any new field of experience, and this must be more than ever true of opinion expressed about the subject-matter of a book which is an account of experimentation resulting in the development of a technique involving new and unfamiliar sensory experiences.

Letter: "The Use of the Self–2" (1932) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995), page 134

Those in need of physical development will always be people whose manner of use of themselves is tending to lower their standard of general functioning, and this will be associated with misdirection of energy to the musculature through unreliable and deceptive sensory guidance (feeling).

Today the unreliability of our sensory mechanisms is widely recognized, as, for instance, in a deterioration in our sensory observation and awareness.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 43

Here are people whose physical development is unsatisfactory, and this is associated with their sensory misdirection of their habitual use of themselves.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 44

In the case of the addict such a decision is difficult to carry out, because of the nature of the sensory experiences which have been habitually associated with his attempts to satisfy his need. As long as this need persists, these experiences are a continuous stimulus to indulgence in his bad habit, and hence the carrying-out of a decision not to indulge implies inhibiting his habitual reaction to the stimulus arising from the sensory experiences which are the background of his craving. These sensory experiences are as much a part of such addicts, and exercise as harmful an influence towards indulgence, as the habitual sensory experiences which influence people towards indulgence in certain harmful ways of using themselves in keeping their equilibrium in standing, sitting, walking, and other activities. The sense of satisfaction which comes from the indulgence in both these cases is associated with "feeling right" and comfortable, although associated with a particular manner of use which is lowering the standard of general functioning and bringing about ill health and disease.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 74-75

By the repetition of these experiences the pupil develops confidence, and whereas at an earlier stage in these experiences he registered doubt and confusion, little by little the new lines of motor and sensory communication are laid down along which he will sooner or later habitually project his messages.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 83

Moreover the experiences thus gained not only help in developing and quickening the recalling and connecting memory, but cultivate what I shall call the motor-sensory-intellectual memory.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 88

In consequence of the unreliability of his sensory impressions, man's interpretation of his own and other people's experience in living is too often faulty and illusive, and he is liable to arrive at false conclusions, and to form erroneous judgements, especially where the motives for his own and other people's behaviour and general activities are concerned.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 91

Hence when the moment comes that he is called upon to employ the new means by a new and unfamiliar use of himself, he finds that in spite of his intellectual acceptance of them as best for his purpose, he is without the necessary sensory confidence to carry out his task, a confidence which would be his if he were asked to carry out "means-whereby" that were familiar to him.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 93

As can be demonstrated, most people send messages which initiate overaction of certain groups of muscles, and too often bring into action muscles which should not be brought into action at one and the same time, all indications of misdirection arising from that faulty sensory guidance and control which is so common in people today.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 106

The sensory mechanism receives an impression by means of the cell receptors, and this impression is a stimulus to the excitors resulting in a reaction in the form of the production of energy.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 112

The projection of messages necessary to the carrying out of new procedures is inseparable from previously unknown sensory experiences of use and functioning,

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000), page 152

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