Wish, wishing, unwished

X has learned to do this automatically, and at first seems incapable of controlling those lip muscles when the wish to speak is initiated.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996, London), page 34

We all know of men and women who became drug fiends merely through wishing to experience the sensation or sensations produced by the drug.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996, London), page 41

Thus it will be seen that the difference between the new habit and the old is that the old was our master and ruled us, whilst the new is our servant ready to carry out our lightest wish without question, though always working quietly and unobtrusively on our behalf in accordance with the most recent orders given.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996, London), page 57

They may be suffering from many physical disabilities or from actual physical pain, and they may and will protest most earnestly that they want to be free from their pains and disabilities, but in face of the evidence we must admit that if the objective wish is really there, it is so feeble as to be non-existent for all practical purposes.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996, London), page 62

It is the wish, the conscious desire to do a thing or think a thing, which results in adequate performance.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996, London), page 63

Once eradicate the mental habit of thinking that this effort is necessary, once postulate and apprehend the meaning of "I wish" instead of those former contradictions, and what was difficult will become easy, and pleasure will be substituted for pain.

Man's Supreme Inheritance (Mouritz, 1996, London), page 64

An attempt to learn something or to learn to do something is the natural response to a stimulus (or stimuli) resulting from a wish or need to learn something or to learn to do something, . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 36

. . . and, by the same rule, if in the sphere of learning and learning to do, the direction and control are unsatisfactory, the response to the stimuli concerned with the wish or needs in connection with the acts of attempting to learn something or of learning to do something will likewise be unsatisfactory, . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 37

Since, as we have seen, the standard of functioning in the performance of any psycho-physical act depends upon the conception which influences the direction and control of the mechanisms involved, it is most essential to give consideration to this all-important matter of conception, in connection with the understanding of what we wish to learn or learn to do, . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) pages 40-41

This fact is that whenever we wish to convey to anyone a new idea, whether by the written or spoken word, that is to say, to teach him something, the person wishing to make use of it by that psycho-physical activity which we call learning something must first get his or her conception of what is indicated by those written or spoken words, and his practical use of the new idea will be conditioned by this conception.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) pages 83-84

In other words, volition is used to name what we intend to do, and inhibition to name what we refuse to do - that is, to name what we wish to hold in check, what we wish to prevent.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 104

In the present instance, it is explained to him that the order given is to be merely preventive - a projected wish without any attempt on the pupil's part to carry it out successfully.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 125

Therefore, when we wish, as we say, to "take a breath" (inspiration), all we have to do is to reduce the pressure exerted upon the lungs by the chest walls, . . .

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 139

It then follows that if we wish to exhale breath (expiration), we merely have to increase the pressure on the lungs by contracting the walls of the thorax, thereby overcoming the atmospheric pressure exerted within the lungs, and thus forcing the air out of them.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 139

He had simply taken alcohol occasionally, as he had taken many other things in the way of food and drink, never for a moment meaning that it should become a habit, or even suspecting that he lacked the ability either to continue taking it only occasionally, or to discontinue taking it altogether if he so wished.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 154

The boy wishes to walk. The stimulus to do so produces an immediate response involving the processes concerned with subconscious guidance and control which are habitual, but which depend for efÞciency upon a given standard of co-ordinated functioning of the organism.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 158

There can be little doubt that the conception and use of concentration sprang from a desire for the ease, spontaneity and healthy enjoyment associated with that use of the organism which is considered a successful one, and which is characteristic of people who are said to "give their attention" to whatever they wish to do.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 171

In order to illustrate these points, we will deal with the practical experiences of the human creature in the fields of recreation and games, because we may assume that here, at any rate, he will be acting in accordance with the dictates of his own wishes and desires, in the anticipation of those psycho-physical experiences which make for happiness.

Constructive Conscious Control of the Individual (STAT Books, 1997, London) page 193

If any reader doubt this, I would ask him if he can furnish any proof that the process involved in the act, say, of lifting an arm, or of walking, talking, going to sleep, starting out to learn something, thinking out a problem, making a decision, giving or withholding consent to a request or wish, or of satisfying a need or sudden impulse, is purely "mental" or purely "physical."

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 5

My reader will remember that in my earlier experiments, when I wished to make certain of what I was doing with myself in the familiar act of reciting, I had derived invaluable help from the use of a mirror.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 16

I had proved in my own case and in that of others that instinctive control and direction of use had become so unsatisfactory, and the associated feeling so untrustworthy as a guide, that it could lead us to do the very opposite of what we wished to do or thought we were doing.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 23

After watching him play, the professional tells him among other things that he is taking his eyes off the ball, and impresses on him that if he wishes to improve his stroke, he must keep his eyes on the ball.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 49

This means that the golfer will be able to keep his eyes on the ball when he wishes to do so, for new and reliable "lines of communication" will have been laid down, which ensures that what he "wills" to do he ultimately does; . . .

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 61

No method of "cure" can be accepted as effective or scientific, if, in the process of removing certain selected symptoms, other symptoms have been left untouched and if new, unwished-for symptoms have appeared.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 77

 I impressed upon him once more that if he wished ever to be confident of saying T and D and words in which these consonants occur without stuttering, he must refuse to respond to any stimulus either front within or without to say T or D; . . .

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 79

My teaching experience has shewn me that the worse these conditions are in a pupil and the longer they have been in existence, the more familiar and right they fed to him and the harder it is to teach him how to overcome them, no matter how much he may wish to do so.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 84

 . . . and that this brings their case at once into line with that of the golfer who cannot keep his eyes on the ball when he wishes to, and of the stutterer who cannot speak as he desires.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 111

  I will say at once that of course no one could give a general definition of a satisfactory reaction which would meet the particular circumstances of every case, but we shall surely all agree that in cases where people wish to improve themselves, or to make changes which they consider will be for their good, or to overcome defects and bad habits, their reaction may be considered satisfactory when they succeed in doing what they have reasoned out is the right thing for them to do.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 111

 For this reason, all those who wish to change something in themselves must learn to make it a principle of life to inhibit their immediate reaction to any stimulus to gain a desired end, and, in order to give themselves the opportunity of refusing to fall back upon the familiar sensory experiences of their old habitual use in order to gain it, they must continue this inhibition whilst they employ the new direction of their use.

The Use of the Self (Methuen, 1932, London) page 115

But if we are going to do, not a mechanical exercise, but something real that matters, you have to think out beforehand the means whereby you have to do it, and give the directions or orders for these means whereby, in the form of a wish, as it were, and keep that wish going all through the activity.

"Bedford Physical Training College Lecture" (1934) in Articles and Lectures (Mouritz, 1995, London), page 168

According to the conception of change most generally held in the past and which still persists today, "creative power," "willing" and "wishing," as expressed in the words "I will" or "I will not," are means whereby change can be brought about, and those who favour methods based on this conception employ them as an aid to their accomplishment in all fields of activity. In doing this they depend upon instinctive (automatic) guidance and control of themselves on the trial-and-error plan, without giving consideration to the question of how to "do" the "doing" that is inseparable from the practice of "wishing" and "willing."

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000, London), page 94

His only idea of "cure" for his disabilities is to concentrate still harder on "wishing" and "willing" on the same old plan as before, . . .

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000, London), page 95

 . . . it is an act of inhibition which comes into play when, for instance, in response to a given stimulus, we refuse to give consent to certain activity, and thus prevent ourselves from sending those messages which would ordinarily bring about the habitual reaction resulting in the "doing" within the self of what we no longer wish to "do."

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000, London), page 101

Their wish is not only "father to their thought" but also to their judgement.

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000, London), page 151

I know many people will try to explain all this away by telling us that we wanted peace. No one will disagree, but the trouble lay in the nature of the "wanting," which was too closely allied to the attitude of "willing" and "wishing" as such. What, I wonder is wrong with the letter W?

The Universal Constant in Living (Mouritz, 2000, London), page 185

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